“Each painting tells a story in black and white, with a medium hue of pink.”
– Candace Lovely

Candace Lovely’s “Good and Plenty” collection was born of a 2001 gallery show by the same name featuring “the element of attraction, where each painting tells a story in black and white, with a medium hue of pink.” The idea and palette were inspired when she was painting one of her many “fair women on the shore” pieces and noticed the combination of the model’s dark hair, black ribbons on a white dress, black dog, and the pink of beach roses and other accessories. “It reminded me of Good & Plenty candies and how their bright colors made you feel” (considering the candies themselves, the colors on the box, and the era that incorporated these colors into pop culture).

Good_and_Plenty_America_Painting
Marilyn_Good_and_Plenty

To create the collection, Lovely reinvented iconic images reminiscent of and influenced by Andy Warhol’s style of posterization. Perhaps the most prominent piece is the Jackie Kennedy tryptic which Lovely says “tells the story of her life without words, starting in white, peaking in pink, ending in black.” The flipside of the icon coin was Good and Plenty Marilyn, which in reality is a self-portrait with Lovely sitting as Monroe. Birthing the collection 2001 when “flags were everywhere after 9/11,” Lovely turned to a set of historic flags, reimagining the Stars and Stripes and its colonial predecessor the Betsy Ross. Further exploring the concept of attraction – good and bad, as the artist clarifies – led to the inclusion of the confederate flag in an attempt to revisit one of the most controversial American images and bring together the edges of conflict and harmony.

Good and Plenty’s color scheme is not exclusive to this collection but found throughout Lovely’s works. This is not unusual as the artist’s voice and passions are so well established, they often overlap: Fair women intertwine with Lowcountry when figures are painted against marshes; Nantucket intermingles with Still Life as Lovely populates a canvas with island objects. Similarly, the original “Good and Plenty” branded palette can be found in nearly every collection (Westies and Fair Women most prominently), intended, as Lovely describes, “to cause a vibration of the primary color and an electricity for the viewer.”

Home_Good_and_Plenty

Candace Lovely’s “Good and Plenty” collection was born of a 2001 gallery show by the same name featuring “the element of attraction, where each painting tells a story in black and white, with a medium hue of pink.” The idea and palette were inspired when she was painting one of her many “fair women on the shore” pieces and noticed the combination of the model’s dark hair, black ribbons on a white dress, black dog, and the pink of beach roses and other accessories. “It reminded me of Good & Plenty candies and how their bright colors made you feel” (considering the candies themselves, the colors on the box, and the era that incorporated these colors into pop culture).

Good_and_Plenty_America_Painting_mobile

To create the collection, Lovely reinvented iconic images reminiscent of and influenced by Andy Warhol’s style of posterization. Perhaps the most prominent piece is the Jackie Kennedy tryptic which Lovely says “tells the story of her life without words, starting in white, peaking in pink, ending in black.” The flipside of the icon coin was Good and Plenty Marilyn, which in reality is a self-portrait with Lovely sitting as Monroe. Birthing the collection 2001 when “flags were everywhere after 9/11,” Lovely turned to a set of historic flags, reimagining the Stars and Stripes and its colonial predecessor the Betsy Ross. Further exploring the concept of attraction – good and bad, as the artist clarifies – led to the inclusion of the confederate flag in an attempt to revisit one of the most controversial American images and bring together the edges of conflict and harmony.

Good_and_Plenty_Portfolio_Marilyn_Mobile

Good and Plenty’s color scheme is not exclusive to this collection but found throughout Lovely’s works. This is not unusual as the artist’s voice and passions are so well established, they often overlap: Fair women intertwine with Lowcountry when figures are painted against marshes; Nantucket intermingles with Still Life as Lovely populates a canvas with island objects. Similarly, the original “Good and Plenty” branded palette can be found in nearly every collection (Westies and Fair Women most prominently), intended, as Lovely describes, “to cause a vibration of the primary color and an electricity for the viewer.”

Good_and_Plenty_home_Painting_Mobile